Returning to Activities after a Foot Fracture Surgery

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Running After Foot Fracture SurgerySnowshoeing may not get the hype that snowboarding or skiing do, but don’t underestimate this activity and how it can make you work! It’s a great way to exercise in the winter weather and enjoy nature. It’s easier on your feet than other winter sports, too—which can be a good thing if you’re in the recovery stage of an injury like a foot fracture, and particularly if you’ve had surgery! You have to take activities slowly as you recover, though, so be careful not to rush it too much.

A foot fracture is a serious enough injury on its own, but one that requires surgery to heal is even more significant. Usually you have foot surgery when the broken ends of one or both bones is unstable and not healing correctly, or are displaced and can’t be easily manipulated into place. Surgery corrects this and keeps the bones secure so they heal.

For your foot to fully recover and return to complete strength, however, you need invested after-care. Your foot will be weak and at risk for re-injury. Proper therapy after a foot fracture works to protect your limb and help you heal during this vulnerable stage. There are a few key things to help your healing bones:

  • Immobilization – Bones have to be kept completely still as they heal. This allows the ends to join back together. After your surgery, your foot will be casted or put into a special boot. You’ll need to avoid walking on that limb for a while, too, so you don’t aggravate the injury.

  • Physical Therapy – Once the initial fracture has healed to a certain point, you’ll slowly start to put weight on it and regain some range of motion in order to handle normal movement later. You’ll also begin strengthening exercises and flexibility stretches.

  • Good Nutrition – Bone repair requires nutrients. You’ll need to consume plenty of healthy foods and stay away from tobacco products. Foods with calcium and vitamin D are particularly important, since they are used for bone formation.

Bones take weeks to heal, and ever longer to recover their full mobility. You won’t get back to your pre-surgery strength if you don’t take care of your foot as it heals. Let Podiatry Associates, P.C., in Castle Pines and Parker, CO, help you change that. Contact our office for an appointment through our website, or by calling (303) 805-5156 to reach us.

Photo Credit: Sura Nualpradid via FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Dr. Cynthia Oberholtzer-Classen, DPM
Founder and Owner of Podiatry Associates, PC
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